Tag Archives: marine biology

Copeia Marine Biologist frogfish front cover

Our Marine Biologist Daniel Geary’s photo of his favourite critter made it to the world renowned scientific magazine Copeia this month and we’re very proud. Copeia is the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists and the picture on the cover is of an ocellated frogfish.

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Nemo's Biggest lie, Marine Biology, Daniel Geary, Atmosphere Resorts, Dumaguete Philippines

Finding Nemo – A Marine Biologist’s View As a marine biologist, one of the problems I have while watching movies that involve the ocean is that I see mistakes that many people don’t realize are there. Even though they don’t really affect the movie, they still bother me. One of my favorite instances of one of these mistakes is in “The Beach.” There is a shark attack in a shallow, secluded cove and the culprit appears to be a mako shark. Although not impossible, this species is usually found in deeper water and it would have been more appropriate to …

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Clownfish - False Clown Anemonefish by Ulrika Kroon Atmopshere Resort Dauin Dumaguete Philippines

With the movie “Finding Nemo”, the clownfish leaped to instant fame. Cute, colorful and with a distinctive personality, they are hard to miss on the coral reef. Believe it or not, there are actually thirty different species of clownfish including the “false clown anemonefish”, the species that our friend Nemo belongs to. Clownfish are a type of damselfish and are also referred to as anemonefish, due to the fact that they live in anemones. There are ten different species of anemones that are hosts to clownfish, with some clownfish only found in one species while others can be found in all …

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Hairy Shrimp If you have been diving on the Atmosphere house reef, then you know that we like to spend a lot of time in the seagrass during the safety stop. Sometimes we find frogfish, nudis, pygmy squid, different species of pipefish, and even the occasional octopus. Not many of these, besides baby frogfish, are incredibly tiny, so you might be wondering – why is the dive guide inspecting every blade of grass? The answer is that they are searching for one of my new favorite critters, the hairy shrimp (Scientific Name: Phycocaris simulans)! Before I arrived at Atmosphere in 2014, …

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Underwater selfie with a blue ringed octopus at Atmosphere Resort Philippines with Daniel Geary

One of many reasons I enjoy working at Atmosphere is that I can take my camera with me when I am diving with guests. Not only does this help me build my portfolio, but guests can get a better view of the tiny macro critters we see when the photos are enlarged on my computer after the dive.  This has been a great year for my underwater photography – I won a category in a national photo contest and I have had my photographs in my first three publications – two photos in Sport Diver Magazine (April, October) and two …

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