christmas critters of dauin

Christmas tree worm (Spirobranchus giganteus) Aptly named to be at the top of our list, Christmas tree worms are a type of tube-building polychaete worm. Their multicoloured (and tree-like) spiral tentacles can be seen poking out of holes they’ve board into corals and are used to catch passing prey which is then passed down into their mouths. Popular with photographers, these brightly coloured underwater Christmas trees will disappear in front of our eyes should they sense anyone getting too close. Humbug dacyllus (Dascyllus aruanus) Despite it’s name, I like to think the Humbug dacyllus is a happy little fish and …

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PADI Specialty courses are a great way to learn specific scuba skills and when Atmosphere’s marine biologist Daniel Geary suggested that he writes his own PADI distinctive specialty course, we knew immediately what it was going to be about. Being an avid fan of frogfish, Daniel wrote the Frogfish Specialist course – and after PADI’s approval, it has proven to be a very successful course, in part because of Daniel’s passion for this quirky fish. Daniel has certified 56 Frogfish Specialists up to today and – unsurprisingly – the course is even more popular during frogfish season. Between April and June this …

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Rhinopia in Dauin Dumaguete Philippines at Atmosphere Resorts

After a couple of weeks of rumors in the area, we can confirm with these awesome shots by Atmosphere’s marine biologist Daniel Geary that we do indeed have Rhinopia here in Dauin. Still a baby, this weedy rhinopia (Rhinopias frondosa) hopefully has many friends around. We also hope that he or she will find a nice colored sponge or coral to sit next to and take on a  bit of color – as they expertly do. Rhinopias are among the holy grails of macro diving – very rare species within the scorpion fish family. There are 6 different Rhinopias and this …

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shaun the sheep nudibranch

Unless you are a scientist, you are probably familiar with common names when describing a type animal, like CLOWNFISH or TIGER. Sometimes, names are more specific, like Tomato Clownfish or Sumatran Tiger, describing only one species. Occasionally these common names overlap and two different species have the same name. How confusing! How can a scientist differentiate between them using only the common name? The answer is that every animal has a scientific name. Latin is the preferred language for scientific names and is the standard among all animals, so it doesn’t matter what language the scientists speak or where they …

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Copeia Marine Biologist frogfish front cover

Our Marine Biologist Daniel Geary’s photo of his favourite critter made it to the world renowned scientific magazine Copeia this month and we’re very proud. Copeia is the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists and the picture on the cover is of an ocellated frogfish.

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